Me Want It (But Me Wait): Appreciating your child’s amazing qualities

“Me get this feeling when a box of cookies are on the shelf, Me want to grab it, want to eat it, can’t control myself.”

Please watch this video before reading:

 

 

Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster has always been somewhat of an impulsive character, having an insatiable appetite for cookies. In fact, he has been willing to eat just about anything, from a variety of foods to inedible items such as car parts. Cookie also seems to be a bit hyperactive, having little self-regulation or self-control. In Sesame Street’s first season, Cookie (then an unnamed monster) played the role of a toddler who got in the way of everything without thinking and who threw tantrums when he didn’t get his way. He also became known for constantly interrupting Kermit’s lessons, like when Kermit was teaching viewers about the letter ‘W’ and Cookie kept eating it.

 

Cookie reminds me of many of the students with whom I work.

You see, like Cookie, they often have difficulties with executive functions and struggle with paying attention, distractibility, goal setting, decision making, getting started, handing in assignments, forgetting/losing materials, checking over work, self-regulation, impulse control, organization, flexibility, and time-management.

As we can see in this video, however, Cookie is working very hard on self-control and is using some very important techniques, such as STOP AND THINK and TAKE DEEP BREATHS. These strategies, along with breaking tasks into smaller parts, setting concrete rules, organizing through calendars, and using a reward system are excellent methods to help children like Cookie succeed at school and at home.

As we approach the end of the academic year, however, I’d like to bring your attention to something else that is just as important:

ACKNOWLEDGING AND HONORING YOUR CHILD’S AMAZING QUALITIES!

Think about Cookie: despite his faults, his impulsivity, his gravitation towards eating unhealthy foods, his inappropriate behavior, and his lack of self-regulation and control, we still love him.

Why, you ask?

Because he is funny, friendly, happy, inquisitive, curious, caring, outgoing, personable, original, fun, spontaneous, energetic, enthusiastic, eager for acceptance, responsive to positive reinforcement, loyal and passionate (about cookies, of course!).

Today, I challenge you to share a few positive characteristics/traits about your child with the WWM community, and then to share them with your child at the dinner table tonight.

Looking forward to reading all of your positive feedback!

Robin

 

P.S. Brightside Learning is running a unique summer program focusing on academics and executive functions. If your child is experiencing difficulties in these areas, please contact Robin to discuss the options that are available.

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2 Comments

  • Wow, did I relate to this! My son is all the things you listed but he also has amazing qualities which are… he’s very funny, loyal to his family and friends, likes things to be fair not just for him but others around him. and will advocate for them. He is likes to follow the rules which makes him quite responsible. Now that he is a tween he also likes to help out around the house. He loves spending quality ALONE TIME with me his Mom and that warms my heart and hope it never stops!